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Ready To Apply BLO

This is a discussion on Ready To Apply BLO within the Stock forums, part of the Rifle Forum category; After reading all posts, watching all YouTube videos, I've decided to begin applying BLO to my SA Loaded walnut stock starting this weekend. I've used ...


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Old March 10th, 2017, 04:53 AM   #1
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Ready To Apply BLO

After reading all posts, watching all YouTube videos, I've decided to begin applying BLO to my SA Loaded walnut stock starting this weekend. I've used TruOil for years, this is my first attempt with BLO. I think I have the necessary steps down.

I like the matte finish of my stock rifle stock, but the "open" nature of just a stained stock with no sealant (or very little) concerns me. Hopefully with the BLO I can keep the shine to a minimum. I've steel-wooled/sanded a TruOil finish in the past, but while looking awesome, it still has too high a shine for this rifle in my opinion.

The rub down begins tomorrow. If I somehow screw this up, just stand in your backyard. Chances are you'll hear ever-so-faint curse words in the distance. That'll be me. Dogs will be barking, birds will take flight, cows will be moo-ing. Canadians will be able to hear me.

Pics will follow !

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Old March 10th, 2017, 04:55 AM   #2
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Just remember rule # 1 with BLO a little goes a long way.

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Old March 10th, 2017, 05:58 AM   #3
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You can pretty much control your finish by how many coats you use. I have been doing my mil stocks for years using BLO. Like some others I cut my BLO with Mineral spirits. Usually about 50/50. Apply let set for 30 minutes or so, then wipe off excess. Let it sit a few days in between coats. Just thought I would pass along the way I do it.

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Old March 10th, 2017, 06:03 AM   #4
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I really like the look of stocks treated with BLO, but please remember to follow the suggested precautions with using it.

Here's a PDF that explains the hazards you need to be aware of:
http://www.fire.org.nz/Research/Rese...seed%20Oil.pdf

Pay special attention to the paragraph on "oil-soaked rags."

Cheers, and please post up photos of your project.
Good luck!!

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Old March 10th, 2017, 06:05 AM   #5
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If using the BLO you may want to read this, I have been doing it since the 70s. Sorry the pics are gone, but I had a raw 4x4 piece of black walnut that I showed with the shade differences as each of the 3 coats were applied. I still have that chunk and will add a pic for you to examine. Gimme a few minutes to add the pic. Click on the link for instructions.
Qs re: my "salad dressing" mix Update 2/16 pics
Attached Images
File Type: jpg P3090001 (2).JPG (685.7 KB, 82 views)

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Last edited by m1sniper; March 10th, 2017 at 06:22 AM.
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Old March 10th, 2017, 06:12 AM   #6
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isn't teak oil easier?

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Old March 10th, 2017, 06:13 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jersey Devil View Post
I really like the look of stocks treated with BLO, but please remember to follow the suggested precautions with using it.

Here's a PDF that explains the hazards you need to be aware of:
http://www.fire.org.nz/Research/Rese...seed%20Oil.pdf

Pay special attention to the paragraph on "oil-soaked rags."

Cheers, and please post up photos of your project.
Good luck!!
My plan for the rags is quite simple...throw them in my backyard fire pit and use them as a fire starter. The other methods of soaking them in water, laying out in the sun to dry, put them in metal cans is too time consuming for me. I'll just toss, hit the auto-start clicker on my propane torch, rags be gone.

But the curious, geeky side of me wants to keep one or two around, in a safe area, and see if they combust. Fire with no conventional source of ignition intrigues me....

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Old March 10th, 2017, 06:32 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
But the curious, geeky side of me wants to keep one or two around, in a safe area, and see if they combust. Fire with no conventional source of ignition intrigues me....
Are you sure you're allowed to own firearms?

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Old March 10th, 2017, 06:53 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chunker View Post
You can pretty much control your finish by how many coats you use. I have been doing my mil stocks for years using BLO. Like some others I cut my BLO with Mineral spirits. Usually about 50/50. Apply let set for 30 minutes or so, then wipe off excess. Let it sit a few days in between coats. Just thought I would pass along the way I do it.
That's where I'll be playing it by ear (or eye ?). I've seen/read several opinions on how many coats. Some say minimum 3-5, one poster on YouTube did 20 !! I'd like to shoot this rifle again before the years over....

I do plan on hitting it with 0000 stainless steel wool between coats.

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Old March 10th, 2017, 06:57 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Dakar652 View Post
Are you sure you're allowed to own firearms?
The Marines issued me a M16-A1, the state of Texas issued me a concealed carry. So much for keeping firearms out of the hands of the insane.....

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Old March 10th, 2017, 07:37 AM   #11
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It will combust I did it to see for myself. Everything has to align for it to burst Into flames. But the rags will smolder just about every time, if you ball them up.

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Old March 10th, 2017, 03:55 PM   #12
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I like to use Turpentine to thin mine, same 50/50 ratio, applied with 0000 steel wool and I've even "wet" sanded with 220/320/400 with very good results.

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Old March 10th, 2017, 04:15 PM   #13
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I've done several stocks with Linseed oil. If it is a "virgin" piece of wood The first coat is a sloppy wet one vigorously rubbed in by hand. If it raises a bit of grain or fuzz I wet sand with the oil and fine sandpaper just enough to remove the fuzz and wipe off. Set the stock aside till the oil hardens which may take several days.

Apply a second sloppy coat vigorously rubbed in by hand and let sit for about an hour then wipe off the excess and let harden. If the stock is still absorbing lots of oil repeat for a third coat.

After the last sloppy coat is well and truly hardened then proceed with thin coats of just a few drops at a time rubbed in hard with the heel of the hand to generate some heat and to get an even, thin coat over the entire stock. Just a few drops are required. Let harden. In hot, dry weather may only require a day.

Repeat as necessary till the finish is as desired then drop to a coat a week for a few weeks then one a month for two or three months then maybe one a year or as required to repair any scrapes.

Note: This finish will not fill medum sized and large pores in the wood.
Dense wood will take less oil and finish faster.
Let the finish harden between coats. The oil polymerizes on exposure to oxygen to make a plastic like film. If previous coats, especially the sloppy ones are covered before they harden you may get a rather soft finish that takes months or years to harden. Gi stocks that were thoroughly soaked with oil by GIs every time they cleaned them can be a sticky mess decades after their last coat.

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Old March 10th, 2017, 04:21 PM   #14
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For stock maintenance and for the weekly and monthly coats I like to use Gunny paste which is equal parts of BLO, Beeswax, and Turpentine melted together over a double boiler and stored in multiple, small, screw cap jars to exclude air.

Apply with the fingers and rub in thoroughly. Let harden overnight then buff out the next day.

Really makes the stock look good

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Old March 10th, 2017, 05:07 PM   #15
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Mud pie, what 13echo stated is true but your stock is not bare wood please just start with a few drops at the time. I over did it on a old 22 rifle stock and it took me 3 weeks to straighten it out, just trying to help.

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