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Stock Refinishing Clarifications

This is a discussion on Stock Refinishing Clarifications within the Steel and Wood forums, part of the Rifle Forum category; I've been studying up on the fantastic info from users Gus Fisher, Res, and the great Doug Carlton that are sprinkled in assorted threads (mainly ...


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Old March 9th, 2017, 01:19 PM   #1
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Stock Refinishing Clarifications

I've been studying up on the fantastic info from users Gus Fisher, Res, and the great Doug Carlton that are sprinkled in assorted threads (mainly the "Experiment with Teak") and had a couple of general questions.

1) After the slurry sanding, do I leave it overnight to dry before using teak oil on my fingers to rub the dust against the grain? Or do I do that after 10-15min and then wipe off the slurry with the grain using a cloth before letting it dry overnight?

2) Should I only sand in one direction (with the grain) when doing the initial dry sand? I have a walnut stock that I'm practicing on and I think that my back-and-forth sanding may have caused some ill effects. Furthermore, should I always sand with the grain when doing wet sanding as well?

3) About how long do I leave the iron steaming on a dent in one press? I am not sure if I'm not doing it long enough or if a ding just won't come out. Some of them seem like they obviously won't (broken wood fibers) but the ones that seem like softer dents I expected to come out. I'm nervous to leave it on too long and burn it or something, although with the wet rag that shouldn't happen.

Thanks so much for the help. So much great information on here is really inspiring me to learn about woodworking and refinishing classic wood.

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Old March 9th, 2017, 03:06 PM   #2
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Here is the new birch 90% fancy grain VG

If I degrease with Purple Power, can it sit dry for a few days? I'm impatient to see what it looks like



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Old March 9th, 2017, 03:06 PM   #3
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OK, you are going to get different answers to all your questions; so I will start.
1.Slurry sanding; I leave it on for 15-20 min. Than wipe off GENTLY ;;ACROSS the grain.Dry over night.

2. yes ALWAYS sand with the grain. wet sanding or dry sanding

3.I leave the iron on till the steam is gone. If the dent is with the grain, lifting the dent is going to be easy unless the fibers are broken. If the dent is across the grain, is going to be harder. Steaming is done more that one time; steam than let dry over night; steam again next day; until YOU ARE SATISFIED!!!! ;;;;;; It is possible to warp the stock by using to much water and trying to do everything in one day!!!

I hope the stock you are working on is a beater stock for practice .

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Old March 9th, 2017, 05:43 PM   #4
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GREAT LOOKING STOCK! Randy hooked you up.

As for advice, I am no expert, I have just discovered many ways not to do it. My methods change with just about every finish and after time the wood will tell you what to do.

First off, and this is going to be blasphemy to some, you do not need to fill in the grain on Birch if you intend on sanding to at least 400 grit. Yep. It's true. On walnut, HELL YES....let it dry in there and then after it dries give it the old "Indian burn" treatment like you used to do to your younger brother's arm. That will push the slurry further into the grain. Inspect and do it again as many times as you have to to fill the grain to your pleasure. Walnut is stubborn, the higher in grit you finish the more you even out the sheen.

Only sand with the grain. If you have made a mistake against the grain, use the last grit you used with the grain and then sneak in with lighter and lighter grits until you can no longer see the mistake.

Steaming dents takes patience. You are raising the grain everytime you steam and that is what fills the dent. The dent is actually still there, you have just raised the fibers out longer. Imagine growing your hair out longer on an area of your head that has a recess to make your head seem symmetrical. Just go slow, take you time, walk away, listen to a song, come back.

In the end starting with a clean, smooth piece of wood is what brings best results. The prep-work always takes longer than the finishing and always makes the most difference.

Enjoy the process and show us all that beautiful stock when you are finished.



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Originally Posted by M1aInSWPA View Post
I've been studying up on the fantastic info from users Gus Fisher, Res, and the great Doug Carlton that are sprinkled in assorted threads (mainly the "Experiment with Teak") and had a couple of general questions.

1) After the slurry sanding, do I leave it overnight to dry before using teak oil on my fingers to rub the dust against the grain? Or do I do that after 10-15min and then wipe off the slurry with the grain using a cloth before letting it dry overnight?

2) Should I only sand in one direction (with the grain) when doing the initial dry sand? I have a walnut stock that I'm practicing on and I think that my back-and-forth sanding may have caused some ill effects. Furthermore, should I always sand with the grain when doing wet sanding as well?

3) About how long do I leave the iron steaming on a dent in one press? I am not sure if I'm not doing it long enough or if a ding just won't come out. Some of them seem like they obviously won't (broken wood fibers) but the ones that seem like softer dents I expected to come out. I'm nervous to leave it on too long and burn it or something, although with the wet rag that shouldn't happen.

Thanks so much for the help. So much great information on here is really inspiring me to learn about woodworking and refinishing classic wood.

Thanks from chief on one, Rich D and M1aInSWPA
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Old March 10th, 2017, 03:35 AM   #5
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Thanks guys! I'm going to start over on my walnut before working on the nice tiger. The sanding mistakes are minor and I'm sure the tip about retouching those spots will do the trick. Such a rookie mistake.



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Old March 10th, 2017, 07:23 AM   #6
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Doug Carlton: "...As for advice, I am no expert, I have just discovered many ways not to do it."

Oh contrar sir, you are indeed an expert! ! !

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Old March 12th, 2017, 06:06 AM   #7
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Well, I'm such a newbie I was thinking "with the grain" was only one direction. I did it OK the first time... I was afraid I couldnt go back and forth along the grain. I'll get some progress pics up later today



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Old March 12th, 2017, 07:40 AM   #8
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Well in real time you are correct. To experiment sand in one direction about 10 strokes.
Look at the grain;;; than sand 10 strokes in the other direction and look at the grain... In one of the directions the grain will look better . That is the direction you should sand.


It is like chiseling a piece of wood.. You chisel with the grain;;;;; If your chiseling digs out a big piece of wood;;; you are going in the wrong direction ..

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Old March 12th, 2017, 09:37 AM   #9
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Cleaned up with purple power and acetone. Steamed the dings that I could but it was in great shape already. Letting it dry today and doing some more steaming tomorrow.





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Old March 12th, 2017, 09:38 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by chief on one View Post
Well in real time you are correct. To experiment sand in one direction about 10 strokes.
Look at the grain;;; than sand 10 strokes in the other direction and look at the grain... In one of the directions the grain will look better . That is the direction you should sand.


It is like chiseling a piece of wood.. You chisel with the grain;;;;; If your chiseling digs out a big piece of wood;;; you are going in the wrong direction ..
Excellent, I will do this tip. When wet sanding in 3x3 areas does it matter to go one way or is this more for the dry part? I don't want to just push all the oil and dust off if I go one way, but maybe I'm overthinking it

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Old March 12th, 2017, 10:55 AM   #11
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Sanding with the grain gives a much smoother finish. Desirable

Sanding across grain leaves scratches. Don't do this, wet or dry.

Wiping across the grain helps fill pores with oil and sanding debris. This is desirable.

Wiping with the grain tends to pull oil and sanding dust out of the pores leaving them open and unfilled. Not a real no no like sanding cross grain but might as well do it right.

None-the-less a GI type BLO finish will not fully fill wood pores level with the surface unless the wood is very dense with small pores.

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Last edited by 13Echo; March 12th, 2017 at 02:15 PM.
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Old March 12th, 2017, 01:24 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by M1aInSWPA View Post
Excellent, I will do this tip. When wet sanding in 3x3 areas does it matter to go one way or is this more for the dry part? I don't want to just push all the oil and dust off if I go one way, but maybe I'm overthinking it

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Come on!! What do you THINK !! Are you going to make me write it again. LOL

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Old March 12th, 2017, 02:25 PM   #13
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Come on!! What do you THINK !! Are you going to make me write it again. LOL


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Old March 15th, 2017, 04:54 AM   #14
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Progress




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Old March 25th, 2017, 02:16 PM   #15
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Looking good. Almost ready to put the finishing wax on one.







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