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How to increase walnut stock striping contrast? (pic heavy)

This is a discussion on How to increase walnut stock striping contrast? (pic heavy) within the Steel and Wood forums, part of the Rifle Forum category; Originally Posted by Gus Fisher ONE HUGE THING, THOUGH. NEVER PUT A SPIRIT STAIN DIRECTLY ON THE WOOD THAT HAS NOT HAD AT LEAST ONE, ...


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Old December 5th, 2012, 11:19 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gus Fisher View Post
ONE HUGE THING, THOUGH. NEVER PUT A SPIRIT STAIN DIRECTLY ON THE WOOD THAT HAS NOT HAD AT LEAST ONE, SUPER DRY COAT OF BIRCHWOOD CASEY'S TRU-OIL OR SHELLAC ON THE WOOD FIRST. If you don't do that, the end grain will suck it up faster and make the dull/dark areas that look so bad on many service rifle stocks. Hammonje gets around that by applied the stain IN THE OIL, so that doesn't happen.
Please explain this further Gus b/c I don't do this. I may get around this as this dye version is quite dilute in denatured alcohol. Basically, the alcohol evaporates in seconds leaving the dye particles behind and hence dying the walnut. Never had any issues with preferentially stain take up as it absorbs and drys in less than 10 seconds. I'll put 15-20 coats of this stuff on a stock, let it completely dry for 30 minutes and then apply BLO. Zero dye is found on my hands or gloves afterwards. It's all staying in the wood.

I, for one, cannot stand the Tru-oil look. Seems a sealer would prevent absorbtion, but perhaps I am missing something. One thing is for sure...the leather dye you speak of is much more concentrated then what I prepare. I trade dye quantity for control. While it takes me longer to dye the wood...I have more control of the end point. I can even feather in areas and dye certain portions of a stock to match. A lot of that was thought to be impossible, you'd have to strip the entire stock and start over. I found that I could and even asked several friends to try and ID parts I touched up. They always pointed to the wrong areas and could never detect the worked regions. The key for me to get it right is to strip all the oil out of the stock and use a wood preparation material so the dye is taken up evenly. Perhaps that is doing the same as you suggest.

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Old December 5th, 2012, 04:48 PM   #17
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I think that one thing from this is that's there's more than one way to skin a cat. I have decided over time that the spirit stains are the way I like to go most often. I will say that once you learn how to apply it for the look, you can get that military issue result on a G.I. stock with Tru-oil.

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Old January 13th, 2013, 10:58 PM   #18
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Very nice peice of wood you got there!

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Old January 14th, 2013, 09:30 AM   #19
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Gentlemen,

As a newbie starting with his first Garand, a mostly HRA mixmaster with a sanded GI stock, I have to say the timing of this post, not to mention the content, is wonderful. Thank you!

My rifle appears to have been in storage for several years before I recently bought it from a local, private seller. Because the garage is very cold during our mild Arizona winters and my wife is very sensitive to solvent fumes, my stock is just getting a bit of BLO to wake up the very dry wood and I am "working" in a bathroom at the far end of the house.

Even with very thin applications of BLO and waiting as patiently as possible between coats, I have discovered that buffing with a clean old tee shirt really helps smooth out the surface. I guess that is just too basic because there doesn't seem to be much discussion of buffing the surfaces in most of the accounts of methods for the beautiful finishes you guys achieve.

Am I missing something?

Thanks for sharing your wisdom.

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Old January 14th, 2013, 10:02 AM   #20
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From what I've gathered a light wet sanding with high grit sandpaper and BLO/Tung is what a lot of people do to fill in the pores of the wood, also if you have sawdust from sanding it down, you can rub the dust in with oil to fill pores. I've been buffing over mine lightly after every couple coats of BLO with a lint free cloth.

I went with the method Hammonje suggested, though I believe I mixed the dye a bit darker then he intended. In areas where it was a little darker I just used a rag with denatured alcohol on it, and rubbed vigorously in that area until it had lightened to the color I wanted it.

I had originally intended on just trying to get the grain to stand out more, but I really liked the color that came out using Transtint Red Mahogany dye, and decided to do it all this way.
As an afterthough, it ended up almost a complete match to the Esmeralda grips on my 1911.


(ignore the mess, this is my storage room/work room that is in need of a good cleaning.)

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Old January 14th, 2013, 11:48 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Dire88 View Post
From what I've gathered a light wet sanding with high grit sandpaper and BLO/Tung is what a lot of people do to fill in the pores of the wood, also if you have sawdust from sanding it down, you can rub the dust in with oil to fill pores. I've been buffing over mine lightly after every couple coats of BLO with a lint free cloth.
Now that you spell it out, it makes sense. Thanks! And, yeah, achieving a really smooth surface would make me very happy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dire88 View Post
I went with the method Hammonje suggested, though I believe I mixed the dye a bit darker then he intended. In areas where it was a little darker I just used a rag with denatured alcohol on it, and rubbed vigorously in that area until it had lightened to the color I wanted it.

I had originally intended on just trying to get the grain to stand out more, but I really liked the color that came out using Transtint Red Mahogany dye, and decided to do it all this way.
As an afterthought, it ended up almost a complete match to the Esmeralda grips on my 1911.
Isn't it amazing how well some things turn out! My old stock will never be as pretty as yours, but the overall color (pictured below) is fine. But, there are a few lighter areas that would benefit from a tiny bit of stain and there is some spirit based, leather dye in the garage . . . somewhere.



Once it warms up, the "wet sanding with high grit sandpaper and BLO" is in my future. I have been working on the wood without removing any metal parts because I hope to shoot again later this week when it warms up.

Thanks again for your input! It's often amazing how stooopid I feel as a newbie at this.

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Old January 14th, 2013, 12:36 PM   #22
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I learned a new method of grain accentuation from a master woodworker here in Atlanta if anyone is interested I will write up a detailed protocol of how this is done. I've tried it and it works really well. It involves dying the wood then sanding it down off the surface. Since the pores are much more open in the grain the stain penetrates there much more and hence when you sand off the surface the dye remains in the grain lines. Nice!!!!! Then you shellac it lightly and proceed to stain the rest to your liking. The light shellac locks the original dye in the grain. I did Bamban's stock like this and man alive is it superb!!!! Looks almost presentation style. He did not want it too shiny so I'll knock the shine down with steel wool. I am ending up placing about 10 coats of Danish oil on the surface. Is taking almost 2 days to dry since its colder and rather humid. Since it is going to be a match rifle then sealing it is a good thing. Danish Oil is nothing more than BLO mixed with polyurethane.

What you need...

180 and 220 grit 3M sanding sponges
Wax Free Shellac (you end up cutting it 1:5 with pure ethanol)
Naptha (for cleaning)
100% ethanol (I learned denatured alcohol contains methanol and hence has a lot of water; everclear is the very best)
TransTint Dyes
Tung Oil or Danish Oil or BLO (finish coat of your choice)

As Dire88 found out the TransTint dyes work wonders. Dire88...did you not use the mix I sent you????? Shouldn't have been too dark.

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Old January 14th, 2013, 12:43 PM   #23
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Thought I messaged you before, guess I didn't. I never received the dye, guessing it disappeared in the mail. Maybe they heard it sloshing around?

No worries, gave me an excuse to do some learning and pick up some woodworking stuff.
---
Honestly, I didn't even think to sand the stain off the surface and put BLO over it. Sounds like it would come out great. Definitley interested in a writeup and photos.

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Old January 14th, 2013, 01:31 PM   #24
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You might want to try TOMS 1/3 Gun Stock Wax. It sure brings out the grain in the wood.
http://www.thegunstockdoctor.com/Products.html.

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Old January 14th, 2013, 01:48 PM   #25
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Never liked the Toms Mix. Waste of time for me. Smells something awful as some of the mix is Turpentine. Tung Oil is much better if you want build-up.

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Old January 15th, 2013, 10:13 AM   #26
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Anyone try aniline dye? Woodworkers supply has water, alcohol, and oil based aniline dyes in loads of colors. It comes in powder form and you mix it to the concentration you want. From what i gather aniline dye gets into places other dyes with larger molecules can't, its also what is used to dye guitars and make those sweet sunburst fade patterns.


Last edited by Gee Dub; January 15th, 2013 at 10:24 AM.
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Old January 22nd, 2013, 08:31 PM   #27
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hammonje did you by chance take any pics of Bamban's stock? Have you returned it to him yet? If you did then Bamban could you post a few for us gun porn addicts?

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Old January 26th, 2013, 04:07 AM   #28
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What is the appearance and performance difference between boiled linseed oil and pure tung oil? I've been cleaning up a birch M14 stock using tung oil, but I have linseed oil as well.

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