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-   -   Wanted honest scout scope reviews (http://m14forum.com/optics/150895-wanted-honest-scout-scope-reviews.html)

jodi December 9th, 2013 10:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RAMMAC (Post 1268914)
A "Scout" scope is a long eye relief scope that usually mounts on the barrel, not a standard scope that mounts on the receiver. The Leupold VX II is a standard eye releif scope.

RAMMAC,

I hate to tell you this but you are wrong... Leupold does make a VX II Scout scope with 7.75"-8.75" eye relief, I installed it on my brothers Mosin Nagant. I will try to take some pictures tonight if I can get off work at a reasonable hour.

Below is the link to the scope I bought, My brother did not see the point in paying an extra $220 for a 1.5-5x (VX R) versus the 1.5-4x (VX II)

http://swfa.com/Leupold-15-4x28-VX-I...pe-P50858.aspx

jbkf1003 December 9th, 2013 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RAMMAC (Post 1270376)
Nikon still makes the scope but they have renamed to the Force XR EER

Rammac,

Does the BDC work on this scope w/ 308 since it was made for pistol velocities? Or do you just pretend it is not there?

Justin

RAMMAC December 9th, 2013 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jodi (Post 1270969)
RAMMAC,

I hate to tell you this but you are wrong... Leupold does make a VX II Scout scope with 7.75"-8.75" eye relief, I installed it on my brothers Mosin Nagant. I will try to take some pictures tonight if I can get off work at a reasonable hour.

Below is the link to the scope I bought, My brother did not see the point in paying an extra $220 for a 1.5-5x (VX R) versus the 1.5-4x (VX II)

http://swfa.com/Leupold-15-4x28-VX-I...pe-P50858.aspx


Since we are talking about M1A rifles and not Nagants I don't care about how the scope worked on the Mosin. The distance from your eye to the forward edge of the receiver ring on an M1A rifle is about 12 inches, therefor a scope with less than 12 inches of eye relief wont work in a true "Scout" style configuration. Leupold doesn't even call the scope that you are talking about a Scout scope so they aren't even advertising it as being built for that purpose. Just because you call it that and feel that it works for you doesn't make it work like others expect it to. Eye relief of 7.75"-8.75" is standard for most rifle scopes, to be used as a Scout scope you usually need about 12" or more. Some scopes that are actually advertised as Scout scopes are rated at around 9" but that's the minimum eye relief and you usually still have to set the scope at a little farther away from your eye than that. If you position your Leupold at more than 8.75" then you will not have a full field of view.

The Nikon will work with an eye relief of 9" - 30", depending on the magnification.

RAMMAC December 9th, 2013 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jbkf1003 (Post 1270970)
Rammac,

Does the BDC work on this scope w/ 308 since it was made for pistol velocities? Or do you just pretend it is not there?

Justin

The scope was actually designed to be a Scout scope, not a pistol scope. I say this because the old paperwork on the scope (when they still called it the Encore model) explained that most pistol scopes have the parallax zeroed out at 50 yards but this scope has been adjusted for 100 yards, that makes it more suitable for a rifle rather than a pistol. The scope is also designed for heavy recoil.

The BDC reticle works very well, I've used with my rifle out to 400 yards without any problem. They actually have a software program that allows you to account for your load and calculate the ranges for the BDC circles. This is a link to their SpotOn site, you can also buy the software and install it on your home computer. This is an example of where the BDC circles would zero to using American Eagle ammo with a muzzle velocity of about 2550 fps.
http://media501.dropshots.com/photos...209/053248.jpg
The crosshairs would be at the top of the bar just above the top circle, that would be your 100 yard zero. Then the top circle would be below the crosshairs and the center would be 192 yards and the bottom circle would be zeroed at about 307 yards. You can also fine tune the zero point by adjusting the magnification.

EdwardHall3 December 9th, 2013 12:47 PM

I pulled this directly from the Leatherwood website. The MOA differences on the BDC line pretty much mirror what I use for come ups on my m1 and m1a rifles shooting 150 and 147gr respectively. In short I answered my own question. For those that are curious the 308 BDC should work for M2 however you need to do some range work to find out for sure. As always YMMV. I did go ahead and order this scope with BDC. I have about 500 M2 right now so I will post a dedicated review after I mount this and shoot at least 500 rnds.

LER BDC LINE HOLD OVER VALUE
Range- BDC Line- BDC Line Hold Over Values
(Yard) MOA
200yard- Center Cross- 0MOA
300yard- 1st BDC Line- 3MOA
400yard- 2nd BDC Line- 6MOA
500yard- 3rd BDC Line- 10MOA
600yard- Top of the Post- 15MOA

Salps December 29th, 2013 08:28 AM

Heads up leupold for sale at Marlin forum, not mine. You might have to sign in to see it.




http://www.marlinowners.com/forum/ot...s-bc-caps.html

2336USMC December 29th, 2013 10:51 AM

Older thread but I'll throw in my $.02 anyway...

I have a Leupold FX-II 2.5x28 IER Scout scope on my Mauser scout rifle. I have found iot to be an excellent scope. Bright, clear, huge "eyebox" meaning that it has a lot of latitude in eye relief and eye placement which makes it very fast for snap shooting. It has a very large field of view which again helps with fast snap shooting. The magnification is low enough to allow both eyes open scanning and target acquisition, like a red dot optic. Much more magnification and that gets harder for the brain to process.

I have shot a scout rifle with the Burris scout scope. My father has a scout rifle with the Burris, and we spent a good part of an afternoon swapping rifles back&forth to compare, so I have side-by-side experience with both scopes. I found the Leupold much faster and easier to use, the Burris has a narrower field of vision and is not as forgiving in eye placement, and is not as bright.

In my application the scout scope needs to be mounted with the objective lens at about the middle of the front receiver ring to leave the action clear for top loading with stripper clips. The Leupold is one of the few scopes out there with long enough eye relief to allow this. The new variable Leupold scout scopes all have too short eye relief to allow mounting that far forward. Some of the other scopes will allow it, but you are at the very far end of the eye box so any slight misalignment of the eye causes shadowing in the scope view, again slows down snap shooting.

I did buy a Leatherwood 2-7x scope with the intent of swapping it on to the rifle to have a little more magnification when I want to test ammo for accuacy, but I haven't used it yet so I can't really comment.

I keep the Leupold set up with a point blank zero of 225 yards. This put my rounds about 2.5" high at 100 yards (just hold under a couple of inches if it really matters) and 2.5" low out to about 275 yards, so a snap shot on anything that matters can be taken from muzzle to 275 yards without even thinking about trajectory.

EdwardHall3 December 29th, 2013 11:37 AM

Thanks for sharing your experience with the Leupold FX-II 2.5x28 IER Scout scope 2336USMC. I already bought the Hi-Lux however the day I went to zero it the garand didn't want to cycle. I brought it home and gave it an in depth cleaning and made sure the everything was the way it was supposed to. The scope zeroed well and easy to pick up targets on low power. This is hardly the review I promised. Due to work the earliest that will happen is mid Febuary but that will get its own thread. I do plan on getting other scopes so feel free to suggest anything else you have used and thank you for your time.

DenStinett January 2nd, 2014 09:08 PM

I've run two different SightMark TriDuty Scopes on my M1a
First was a 8.5-25X50mm and now a 10-40X56mm
Both are great Scopes and no mater what some may say about enter level Scopes, the SightMark Scope work as well as other Scopes twice or three times the cost
Very clear Optics, with smooth adjusting Turrets and a nice Side Focus
No pics of the 56mm, but here's my M1a with the 8.5-25X50mm on a Bassett High Picatinny Mount with Burris Low Xtreme 30mm Rings

http://i1108.photobucket.com/albums/...M1aOpticsc.jpg

Salps January 3rd, 2014 03:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DenStinett (Post 1290274)
I've run two different SightMark TriDuty Scopes on my M1a
First was a 8.5-25X50mm and now a 10-40X56mm
Both are great Scopes and no mater what some may say about enter level Scopes, the SightMark Scope work as well as other Scopes twice or three times the cost
Very clear Optics, with smooth adjusting Turrets and a nice Side Focus
No pics of the 56mm, but here's my M1a with the 8.5-25X50mm on a Bassett High Picatinny Mount with Burris Low Xtreme 30mm Rings



http://i1108.photobucket.com/albums/...M1aOpticsc.jpg

Hell of a "scout scope" you got there….

rwilli January 3rd, 2014 04:45 AM

I Love the red dot on my AR so I tried it on the Socom mounted forward---I didn't like it, I can do better with irons. SO, I just purchased the Leatherwood 2-7 Scout scope and should have it here tomorrow. As soon as I get it I will head to the range for zeroing and at least 100 rounds----I will gladly provide a report after words.

RAMMAC January 3rd, 2014 11:15 AM

Cheap scopes are just that, cheap.

Everything in life is relative to something and once you've worked with the better quality item you can definitely tell the difference when you use the cheaper item.

While cheaper scopes will work they won't normally last and, once you learn how to test them, they don't normally perform quite as well as the more expensive scopes. They will allow you to do the basic work of magnifying the target and aiming the weapon but they wont do that as well as the more expensive scopes.

I feel that scopes fit in to one of three categories, based on their performance and not necessarily their price;

  • Junk
  • Usable/Reliable
  • Top of the Line
The real proof of where a scope fits is how the scope performs over the long haul compared to the shooter's needs and expectations. One guy can use a SightMark and it does everything he wants and expects while another considers it a piece of junk that can't be relied upon.

To determine if a scope is mechanically reliable you have to perform a box test and optically you need to know how to look for problems with the lenses. I also like to look at how the scope is assembled (screwed together, soldered, etc.). I'd base my initial choice on those parameters. If the glass is clear all the way across when you move your eye from side to side and top to bottom, the knobs feel crisp and and stable when you turn them, and the joints are tight (no gaps where the tube and bells come together) then I'd probably try the scope out if it met all my other needs (eye relief, magnification, physical size).

DenStinett January 3rd, 2014 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Salps (Post 1290351)
Hell of a "scout scope" you got there….

Pardon the hell out of me ! DISHOUT
Guess none of you ever miss read a Threat Header before ! ? !

Maybe, just maybe, this translates into the fact that a SightMark Scope of any type may be worth looking into.....But I probably mistaken


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