M14 Forum


World's first nuclear cruiser up for auction as scrap

This is a discussion on World's first nuclear cruiser up for auction as scrap within the Navy forums, part of the Armed Services category; SEATTLE (Reuters) - The world's first nuclear-powered surface warship, the USS Long Beach, was put up for auction as scrap metal on Tuesday to be ...


Go Back   M14 Forum > Armed Services > Navy

22Thanks
Reply
 
LinkBack Moderator Tools Display Modes

Old July 11th, 2012, 10:02 AM   #1
No social life
 
GARRARD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tampa
Posts: 10,661

Awards Showcase

World's first nuclear cruiser up for auction as scrap

Quote:
SEATTLE (Reuters) - The world's first nuclear-powered surface warship, the USS Long Beach, was put up for auction as scrap metal on Tuesday to be dismantled and recycled, after spending the past 17 years mothballed in a naval shipyard in Washington state.

The 720-foot (219-metre) vessel, the first American cruiser since the end of World War Two to be built new from the keel up, boasted the world's highest bridge and was the last such U.S. vessel with teakwood decks, according to Navy history.

Long Beach, commissioned in 1961, is not the first warship to be recycled. But the defense contractor that exclusively handles such auctions, Government Liquidation, said it would be the first time in its 11-year history that a nuclear powered guided missile cruiser has been sold for scrap.

Other decommissioned U.S. military vessels have been sunk, sold to other countries or more rarely turned into museums open to the public, as was the fate of the storied battleship USS Iowa, which opened in Los Angeles as a museum to much fanfare on Saturday.

"I'm sure that Long Beach was always designated for scrapping. We don't make a lot of ships into museums," said Pat Dolan, spokesperson at the U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command.

All U.S. Navy nuclear cruisers were ordered decommissioned because of defense budget cuts after the 1991 Gulf War during the early 1990s.

Long Beach, which served in Vietnam and provided support during the Gulf War, was decommissioned in 1995 and its two nuclear reactors were deactivated.

Long Beach had 10,000 tons of steel, 300 miles of electrical cable and 450 tons of aluminum, earning it the voice radio call sign "Alcoa" after the aluminum maker of the same name.

More than a dozen scrap dealers have expressed interest in taking part in sealed online bidding for the hull, with more than 7.35 million pounds (3.33 million kg) of steel, aluminum and copper wiring, galley equipment, tables, chairs, lockers and bunks, Government Liquidation president Tom Burton said.

"It's a two-year process but it could take 18 to 26 months," Burton said. "What's left is an inert hull."

Retired engineering officer Doug Harms, 81, served from 1959 to 1962 on Long Beach, which then conducted operational missile testing near Virginia's Norfolk, Germany's Bremerhaven, Cuba's Guantanamo Bay and Puerto Rico's San Juan.

It had a crew of 80 officers and 1,100 enlisted sailors. In a two-month mission in 1964 called "Operation Sea Orbit," Long Beach steamed 30,000 miles without refueling. It joined the USS Enterprise aircraft carrier and USS Bainbridge cruiser in the world's first all-nuclear battle formation, according to Government Liquidation.

"A big ship like that was nice to be on. It was like a big city," said Harms, who now lives in Idaho.

The auction is set to close on Thursday at 5 p.m. Minimum bids are $150.
http://news.yahoo.com/worlds-first-n...040101476.html




Thanks from IC2(SS)19Z50C5
GARRARD is online now  
Remove Ads
Old July 11th, 2012, 11:10 AM   #2
Banned Camp
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Cleman Barracks, Dept. of The Columbia.
Posts: 937
The USS Long Beach (CGN-9)

Yes it is so sad she is finally coming to her final end. Her hull stripped to the main deck has been setting at PSNS, Bremerton, WA for years. The summer of 75, (August) during a USNR drill weekend, I was working aboard a MSO (ocean going minesweeper) at pier 91 in Seattle. The LONG BEACH was mooring on the west side of the old pier 91 complex. She was there with other Pacific fleet elements for Seattle’s SeaFair. Anyway, some of us were tasked as line handlers to receive lines as she tied up. Man did she ever look great. Everyone topside was squared away…

Here first skipper Eugene Wilkinson was also the first skipper of the NATILUS (SSN-571). I had the pleasure of meeting him at the 2009 USSVI convention in San Diego. He signed my copy of “Cruiser for Breakfast”, by Mansfield.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugene_P._Wilkinson

The LONG BEACH when she made her round the world cruise:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Sea_Orbit

With The “Big E” CVAN-65 and The Johnny B. (DLGN-25), well she was pretty much a disarmed nuclear cruiser accord to the book;

“Rickover: Controversy and Genius:” A Biography by Norman Polmar and Thomas B. Allen

A fascinating read on the man the myth the legend. HJR… A nuclear engineering nerd, but if it were not for him winning the
cold ward at sea would have been a much tougher thing to do.

IC2(SS)19Z50C5 is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 11:10 AM   #3
Dodgin' The Reaper
 
High Hat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Murfreesboro, TN
Posts: 8,687
This is the stupid question of the day. I wonder if anyone in our military or government ever thinks that we may desperately need these ships again someday? It has to be much quicker to upgrade and modernize our existing ships instead of building from scratch. It may even save some money!

Thanks from philip26p
High Hat is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 11:19 AM   #4
Site Sponsor
 
ShootingSight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 1,642
I'd bid on it, just to say I did, but with my luck, I'd win the stupid thing, and then be screwed. I live in an apartment with on-street parking, and there's never enough empty parking spots in a row to fit something that big outside my door....

Actually, I can't believe they scrapped the Big E, the greatest aircraft carrier of all time.

Thanks from Seventh Fleet and GARRARD
ShootingSight is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 11:26 AM   #5
Old Salt
 
DaMoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Indianapolis
Posts: 1,424
The last ship built on a true crusier hull too.

Thanks from IC2(SS)19Z50C5
DaMoose is online now  
Old July 11th, 2012, 11:39 AM   #6
Old Salt
 
nSquid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: eastern Iowa
Posts: 1,367
Quote:
Originally Posted by High Hat View Post
This is the stupid question of the day. I wonder if anyone in our military or government ever thinks that we may desperately need these ships again someday? It has to be much quicker to upgrade and modernize our existing ships instead of building from scratch. It may even save some money!
Shutdown maintenance on a used nuclear reactor precludes this. The reactor is already in a burial bed at Hanford, WA.

Upgrading is difficult, the US school system has been so thoroughly raped that it cannot produce the number of quality young men and women needed to keep a large nuclear fleet operational, Congress only gives out money during times of War, why do think we've had so many of them lately?

And often as not what the Pentagon wants or claims is needed is 180 degrees opposed to what Congress thinks.

nSquid is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 11:40 AM   #7
Banned Camp
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Cleman Barracks, Dept. of The Columbia.
Posts: 937
The rake of the bow

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMoose View Post
The last ship built on a true crusier hull too.
Exactly, not since the NORTHAMTON (6 ships) and the PORTLAND (2 ships) classes of Treaty cruisers built prior to WWII did the Navy have a cruiser hull which was as good looking as her’s… The rake of the bow always sets the tone of good looks for me…

http://www.navsource.org/archives/04/026/04026.htm

http://www.navsource.org/archives/04/033/04033.htm

IC2(SS)19Z50C5 is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 12:43 PM   #8
In the gilded halls of Valhala
 
Dredsen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Texas
Posts: 11,828
Who's More Grizzled?


http://www.cracked.com/video_13516_w...Esnl3Ci3E.html

Dredsen is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 01:44 PM   #9
No social life
 
GARRARD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tampa
Posts: 10,661

Awards Showcase

Quote:
Originally Posted by IC2(SS)19Z50C5 View Post
Here first skipper Eugene Wilkinson was also the first skipper of the NAUTILUS (SSN-571). I had the pleasure of meeting him at the 2009 USSVI convention in San Diego. He signed my copy of “Cruiser for Breakfast”, by Mansfield.
First skipper for the first nuclear sub and nuclear cruiser, that guy must have been a bad ass.

Thanks from IC2(SS)19Z50C5
GARRARD is online now  
Old July 11th, 2012, 02:52 PM   #10
Old Salt
 
nSquid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: eastern Iowa
Posts: 1,367
Wondering if it had residual induced radioactivity in structural steel and it was simpler and cheaper to let it decay to background levels rather than cut it out and bury it as radioactive waste. 17 years is a long time at the pier.

If you look at Google Maps or Map Quest for Bremerton, WA, you can see the old relics pier side waiting for stripping. The Los Angeles class attack boats are moving through fairly quickly. The reactor compartments get cut out of the hull, sealed with steel on each end, painted white and shipped up the Columbia River on a special barge for burial. The pit is also visible. Think there was another thread here with the Long and Lat to look at the pit. Surface ships are actually more difficult to extract the reactor, steam generators and other higher level radioactive hardware than a sub.

A whole lot of Cold War tax dollars getting buried out there...

nSquid is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 02:59 PM   #11
Platoon Commander
 
deces's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 542
I hope China makes good use of her.

deces is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 03:30 PM   #12
Banned Camp
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Ohio
Posts: 3,779
Heck I will buy it. I'll need a crew, who's with me????

slayer6769 is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 04:00 PM   #13
Snappin In
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 18
Count me in!

That thing has Zombie Apocalypse survivor ark written all over it. We'll nee another reactor though, anyone have one for sale or trade?

Thanks from GARRARD
Balkandom is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 04:27 PM   #14
Lifer
 
philip26p's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 3,210
She could be the first ship of my possible future island nation.

philip26p is offline  
Old July 11th, 2012, 04:29 PM   #15
Banned Camp
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Cleman Barracks, Dept. of The Columbia.
Posts: 937
Question Residual induced radioactivity in the (CGN-9) hull

Quote:
Originally Posted by nSquid View Post
Wondering if it had residual induced radioactivity in structural steel and it was simpler and cheaper to let it decay to background levels rather than cut it out and bury it as radioactive waste. 17 years is a long time at the pier....
That is my understanding why they let the 586 Boat set so long. Could be Navy Nuclear Urban legend…??? I’ll have to check with some of the guys in the USSVI Bremerton Base who may have some local correct INTEL on the subject. Some of them went on to work at PSNS after retiring from the NAVY. I let you know if I find anything out…

IC2(SS)19Z50C5 is offline  
Reply

  M14 Forum > Armed Services > Navy



Search tags for this page

eugene p wilkinson

,

eugene p. wilkinson

,
ijn atago heavy cruiser
,

pics of ships in battle of leyte gulf

,
scrap auctions allover the world
,

uss long beach cgn 9 gulf war history

,
why did the navy retire cruizers
,
why did the us navy scrap nuclear cruisers?
,
why did the us stop making us navy nuclear cruisers
,
why us nuclear cruiser decommissioning
,
why was the uss long beach retired
,
why were nuclear cruisers decommissioned?
Click on a term to search for related topics.

Moderator Tools
Display Modes




Top Gun Sites Top Sites List