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There's Bedding and than there's:

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Old May 17th, 2017, 09:02 AM   #1
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There's Bedding and than there's:

More bedding... Over the past several years it has been nice to read more Members are doing the bedding themselves. This adds a certain personal value to their rifle...

This Post is not really about the actual bedding process, but more to the stock routing procedures.. I'll confined this to wood stocks mostly..

J.K's Shop Manual has some excellent drawings, these should be reviewed before making a routing chioce.

1..The amount of routing is directly connected to the life of the Bedding..

2'. Plunge routing is the best choice, additional hand cuts even make it better..

3' Slightly over routing is better than under-routing in all cases..

The routing method will determine, to some extent, workable time, and the choice of bedding material used. J B. Weld has a very long work time.. I prefer Marine Tex, which is about half the work time, when BIsonite is not available, there is no Bisonite in Kerrvile, Texas.....

Usually, Posts like this start up a good follow up of Members sharing and questioning information, I hope that follows..

4. Routing is the foundation of the bedding process..

A good bedding job can add up to 40% more accuracy to your M1A/M1.. M1 Garands are more complex to bed [properly] than M1A's. I have seen only a few properly bedding M1's in the last few years,

I'm gonna to here from Washington or Organ, witch is OK, someone can explain it too me later,, maybe... ... Art

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Old May 17th, 2017, 09:12 AM   #2
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I bedded my DCM Garand many years ago for match shooting per the Brownells bedding and fixture kit and other sources too. I did have to re bed a few years later, more a touch up or skim I guess it might be called. I also have bedded a couple of M1A's along with many bolt rifles which are relatively simple compared to our gas guns. If I recall I used as a main tool a Dremel with all its various and sundry cutters to do the bulk of the wood removal but also used hand tools, gouges, chisels etc. My new M1 would no doubt benefit from a bed job but not sure I really care as it shoots as well as a non match rifle can be expected to. Plus I like being able to pop the rifle apart without worrying about wear on the bedding and beating the butt on the bench to break it loose.

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Old May 17th, 2017, 09:17 AM   #3
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Art,

Your comment about more routing is better & life of the job. I presume this means a very thin (skim) is going to break apart before a thicker layer. How does the compound's adherence to wood and structural strength compare to solid wood? Seems there would be a fine line between the perfect thickness of compound and loosing strength of the wood structure. So how does someone judge that perfect thickness except from years of doing it and knowing if previously bedded stocks broke or bedding jobs kept going and going?

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Old May 17th, 2017, 10:06 AM   #4
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Anybody epoxy impregnate their wood?

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Old May 17th, 2017, 10:11 AM   #5
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A tough one..

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Originally Posted by Dougboffl View Post
Art,

Your comment about more routing is better & life of the job. I presume this means a very thin (skim) is going to break apart before a thicker layer. How does the compound's adherence to wood and structural strength compare to solid wood? Seems there would be a fine line between the perfect thickness of compound and loosing strength of the wood structure. So how does someone judge that perfect thickness except from years of doing it and knowing if previously bedded stocks broke or bedding jobs kept going and going?

You must have stayed up to come up with these tough questions..

Skim bedding is excellent, but I think using the same kind of material as the original bedding is best.. Skim bedding can be the best of all choices, very little shrinkage is the advantage..

As to perfect thickness, I have no answer, I use at least . 030" on the side walls Mim..

If the stock is not oil/sol. damaged, you don't need much wood, it becomes the shape support rather than the strength of the procedure..

Bedding jobs on wood require updates far more then fiber.. Maybe Ted will comeon board, he has more experience working with the fiber tha I do..

Stay with it, you are doing fine, kudos...Art

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Old May 17th, 2017, 11:45 AM   #6
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A thin layer of bedding compound on top of another, thicker layer of bedding fair better than a thin layer of bedding compound over wood. Wood will deform slightly under loads, the bedding compound need to be of sufficient thickness to accept the load without failing, either structurally or adhesively.

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Old May 17th, 2017, 01:39 PM   #7
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As to pressure treated stocks... I don't know of any company doing the original type epoxy treatment. There are companies doing acrylic pressure treatment, however they primarily do small pieces. I had a company in Oregon do a stock for me a few years ago. It was beautiful and weighed 1.25 pounds more after treatment, however it was also warped. It had a twist of about 1/8 inch in the forearm rendering it unusable.

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Old May 17th, 2017, 01:43 PM   #8
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I always thought the purpose of routing the stock in the bedding areas was to provide a type of mechanical 'key' to mechanically lock the bedding material 'in' the stock and not just have it 'stick' to the top of the stock.

When I routed my wood GI M1 stock, I just used small round 'Swiss files' to provide gooves in stock about 1/8 wide and deep. It was slow going, but avoided 'power tool mistakes'.

For 1st timers doing a bedding, I recommend a thick epoxy with a putty consistency - I used a product called PC-7, and it worked fine. If you use a thin / runny epoxy it can get very messy .... be prepared!

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Old May 17th, 2017, 01:51 PM   #9
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Even the best epoxy resins can be runny. Bisonite is a good example. It can be very interesting to use. A thickener is available that probably works with most epoxies. It is simply powdered fiberglass which is available at most marine hardware stores. The consistency should be about like pudding.

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Old May 17th, 2017, 02:53 PM   #10
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I've been too chicken too bed my rifle but I'm working up the guts, I would like too get a drill press and a medium machinist table vice for doing the routing then a junk stock....

Maury Krupp turned me onto Colloidal Silica (sp), its a binder/filler that's added too help thicken the bedding soup so its not as runny. Its used on offshore power boat hulls when they fix cracked hulls where shrinkage and use over time could pose a problem.

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Old May 17th, 2017, 03:07 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayKosta View Post
I always thought the purpose of routing the stock in the bedding areas was to provide a type of mechanical 'key' to mechanically lock the bedding material 'in' the stock and not just have it 'stick' to the top of the stock.

When I routed my wood GI M1 stock, I just used small round 'Swiss files' to provide gooves in stock about 1/8 wide and deep. It was slow going, but avoided 'power tool mistakes'.

For 1st timers doing a bedding, I recommend a thick epoxy with a putty consistency - I used a product called PC-7, and it worked fine. If you use a thin / runny epoxy it can get very messy .... be prepared!

Jay Kosta
Endwell NY USA
For first timers I suggest hand tools . . .

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