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Marlin 45-70 - What Do I need to Know Before I Buy?

This is a discussion on Marlin 45-70 - What Do I need to Know Before I Buy? within the Lever Action forums, part of the Gun Forum category; Originally Posted by DudleyDR You could do a better, more precise job with an actual press. Mount it on a 2"x6" board long enough to ...


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Old July 30th, 2016, 12:06 PM   #61
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Originally Posted by DudleyDR View Post
You could do a better, more precise job with an actual press. Mount it on a 2"x6" board long enough to clamp that board to a table for temporary / occasional use.



I don't see how a pistol grip stock would aid in lessening recoil either unless it could help that person pull the firearm into his shoulder prior to firing it. I prefer the straight stock for classical aesthetics. Maybe your shop will let you shoulder one of each to help you decide.

Thanks for the advice about mounting a press to a board. Just curious, as a complete newbie when it comes to hand loading, how much downward pressure is required on the press. I'm guessing that it should be moderate but figured I'd ask before looking for the best place to mount it.

My shop didn't have any straight grip 1895's on the rack but I tried out a 44 mag with a straight grip before I ordered the 1894 and it felt okay. I'm with you in the sense that I like the classic look of the straight pull over the pistol grip, so I'll probably go that route when I order the 1895.



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Old July 30th, 2016, 12:50 PM   #62
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Medved11:

"....how much downward pressure is required on the press. I'm guessing that it should be moderate..." And what is "moderate"? That is a term that is open to interpretation - whether you are a strong guy or a weak guy.

I can't say..that is one of those variables depending on whether it is a pistol or rifle cartridge, your specific chamber internal dimensions, the case wall thickness of the brass and brass alloy that you are using, case annealment, the chamber pressure that expanded that brass to conform to the chamber I.D., the surface area of the outside of the case, the amount of case lubricant that you use, whether you are neck re-sizing or full-length re-sizing, the internal dimensions of your re-sizing die, whether or not your case neck or body have lengthened, how the dies are adjusted, and other things that I probably forgot to mention here.

No simple answer that is accurate.

Reloading is something that I call "deceptively simple". It is more complicated than it appears to be. I suggest that you research all available materials from competent authorities and reloading manuals. Information from one manual is not sufficient. As a start, try to find the series of articles on "pressure" from the Handloader Magazine. It is probably on the internet.

You will need some basic tools like a powder scale and a good caliper - metal is better than a plastic one and a dial caliper is better than one with just a linear, hash-marked scale. I would not rely on a powder dipper to be accurate. Weigh charges or use a quality powder measure to ensure consistency and accuracy. Buy good equipment.

Use match-prep procedures. Never follow the instructions or advice of someone who brags about how many rounds they can reload in an hour. Proper reloading is meticulous and time-consuming. Metallic cartridge re-loading is in a whole different world than shotshell re-loading.

With all of that said, straight-walled cases are easier to reform than bottle-necked cases and depending upon how large of a range "moderate" covers...

Research and educate yourself. Be safe. Best wishes!

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Last edited by DudleyDR; July 31st, 2016 at 07:39 AM.
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Old July 31st, 2016, 01:14 PM   #63
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Thanks for the info, I appreciate it.

I think that I may not have been clear when I asked about how much downward pressure is required. What I was really trying to ask is whether I'd be able to clamp the press to a folding card table instead of a fixed workbench and be able to do what I need to do.

I'm a little hesitant to have something makeshift but it may be what I need to do until I can get my workbench situation sorted out to where I can have a more permanent reloading station set up.

I was talking to a guy this morning at the gun range that reloads and he thought i could get away with the card table idea to start out when doing small batches of reloads with the Lee Loader kit, but he didn't think that it would be a good idea if I was going to use a press.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DudleyDR View Post
Medved11:

"....how much downward pressure is required on the press. I'm guessing that it should be moderate..." And what is "moderate"? That is a term that is open to interpretation - whether you are a strong guy or a weak guy.

I can't say..that is one of those variables depending on whether it is a pistol or rifle cartridge, your specific chamber internal dimensions, the case wall thickness of the brass and brass alloy that you are using, case annealment, the chamber pressure that expanded that brass to conform to the chamber I.D., the surface area of the outside of the case, the amount of case lubricant that you use, whether you are neck re-sizing or full-length re-sizing, the internal dimensions of your re-sizing die, whether or not your case neck or body have lengthened, how the dies are adjusted, and other things that I probably forgot to mention here.

No simple answer that is accurate.

Reloading is something that I call "deceptively simple". It is more complicated than it appears to be. I suggest that you research all available materials from competent authorities and reloading manuals. Information from one manual is not sufficient. As a start, try to find the series of articles on "pressure" from the Handloader Magazine. It is probably on the internet.

You will need some basic tools like a powder scale and a good caliper - metal is better than a plastic one and a dial caliper is better than one with just a linear, hash-marked scale. I would not rely on a powder dipper to be accurate. Weigh charges or use a quality powder measure to ensure consistency and accuracy. Buy good equipment.

Use match-prep procedures. Never follow the instructions or advice of someone who brags about how many rounds they can reload in an hour. Proper reloading is meticulous and time-consuming. Metallic cartridge re-loading is in a whole different world than shotshell re-loading.

With all of that said, straight-walled cases are easier to reform than bottle-necked cases and depending upon how large of a range "moderate" covers...

Research and educate yourself. Be safe. Best wishes!

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Old July 31st, 2016, 08:07 PM   #64
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I agree with the his opinion IRT the card table. I'd get the Lee Loader or the Lyman 310, and a decent scale like the RCBS 505 if you're concerned about charge weights. I wouldn't be for low to mid range loads, but if you're planning on working near maximum, then I definitely would weigh the powder charge and not rely on the dipper.

They do have portable stands for regular presses that you can shove into a closet or in a corner, if space is a concern, and they will withstand the pressure that a single stage will have, though unless you plan on case forming or bullet swaging the down pressure will not be too excessive.

https://www.natchezss.com/frankford-...ing-stand.html

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Old July 31st, 2016, 08:49 PM   #65
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You can try a folding table and see how it works. I suspect it probably won't work that great and you will need to put some weight on the table. What is obviously going to work the best, is you need to secure the press to a heavy fixed work bench. Once you get that sorted out. By the way if you are re-sizing "straight walled" cases it takes less force then cases with a neck.

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Old August 3rd, 2016, 06:31 AM   #66
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Marlin 45-70 - What Do I need to Know Before I Buy?

I took the plunge last night and placed an order with my FFL for a 1895 GBL I also bought a Lee Loader 45-70 kit from Amazon this morning. My plan is to start doing my reloads with the Lee Loader until I can get my garage rearranged to find some space set up a single stage press.

I'll post some pictures of GBL when I pick it up.

Thanks again for all of the advice - I'm sure that I'll have more questions once I have the gun and start hand loading


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Old August 4th, 2016, 07:40 AM   #67
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And now the fun begins...enjoy the ride!

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Old August 4th, 2016, 08:26 AM   #68
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And now the fun begins...enjoy the ride!

Thanks - I'm really starting to understand the lever gun addiction. I went from never really having much interest in them to a full blown "addict" in about a month's time. I'm enjoying my 30-30 and .44, but I'm really looking forward to trying out the .45-70 once it arrives




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Old August 4th, 2016, 09:59 AM   #69
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Medved11 I haven't read the whole thread....been away so haven't been following up!!! But welcome to the lever gun addiction, on the Marlin Owners forum we call it "Marlinitis" and I am a prime example of what happens when you catch it!! Over a dozen Marlins in the safe and always looking at more!!!

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Old August 4th, 2016, 11:30 AM   #70
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Medved11 I haven't read the whole thread....been away so haven't been following up!!! But welcome to the lever gun addiction, on the Marlin Owners forum we call it "Marlinitis" and I am a prime example of what happens when you catch it!! Over a dozen Marlins in the safe and always looking at more!!!
LOL - Thanks, I must have a pretty bad case of Marlinitis because I went from zero lever guns to (soon to be) three in no time. All it took was that afternoon a couple weeks ago when I took a few shots with my friend's 336 (before that I had never fired a lever gun other than my father's Henry .22 when I was a kid).

I just called Marlin customer service to do some research on the serial numbers of my 336 and 1894 and found out that my 336 was built in 2016 and the 1894 was built in 2015. Other than a little bit more wobble in the lever on the 1894 vs. the 336, I'm very happy with the overall fit and finish with both guns.

Counting down the days until my .45-70 shows up at my FFL so that I can take it home. I'll post a "family" picture once I've got it.

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Old August 4th, 2016, 11:40 AM   #71
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I have been bit by the lever action bug...and love the results. I like them all, Henry's, Uberti's, Rossi's and Marlins.

I am limited to 22LR, 45LC, and lastly 45-70.

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Old August 4th, 2016, 12:26 PM   #72
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Yea, here are a few of mine:

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Old August 4th, 2016, 01:14 PM   #73
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Yea, here are a few of mine:



Nice - What model is the one on top with the raised rear sight?


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Old August 4th, 2016, 03:50 PM   #74
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Nice advantage of a lever gun is that you're not chasing your ejected brass. Shooting from a bench rest at the range the brass drops right onto the table!

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Old August 4th, 2016, 04:06 PM   #75
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Medved11 View Post
I took the plunge last night and placed an order with my FFL for a 1895 GBL I also bought a Lee Loader 45-70 kit from Amazon this morning. My plan is to start doing my reloads with the Lee Loader until I can get my garage rearranged to find some space set up a single stage press.
I suggest going with a turret press like the Lee. That way you can screw in your dies and set them in the turret and be done with that caliber. Want to change to a different caliber? Another turret and set of dies and you're done after adjustment and locking them in. http://leeprecision.com/4-hole-turre...uto-index.html If you're going to get really serious and start resizing, renecking brass or swaging lead bullets then a C press is much stronger.

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