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Improving Double Action Trigger Pull on GP100?

This is a discussion on Improving Double Action Trigger Pull on GP100? within the Handguns forums, part of the Gun Forum category; I have looked over the Wolff Springs available for the GP100. The single action trigger is perfect on it, but the double action is not ...


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Old September 1st, 2006, 08:03 AM   #1
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Improving Double Action Trigger Pull on GP100?

I have looked over the Wolff Springs available for the GP100. The single action trigger is perfect on it, but the double action is not that great, I'd like to lighten the pull a little.

This is my first revolver so I don't know what springs do what.

They have "hammer springs" in 9, 10, 11, 12, and 14 (factory) lb. and "trigger return springs" in 8, 10, and 12 (factory) lb. available for the GP100 from Wolff.

What springs affect what? Will changing the main spring change the single and double action pull? What spring do I need to change?

The bottom line is that I want to smooth out and lessen the double action pull without losing any reliability, I don't want it super light, just lighter, what spring change should I do to accomplish that?

What does the hammer sping do and what does the trigger return spring do exactly?

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Old September 2nd, 2006, 07:45 AM   #2
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Both will have some effect on the double action pull. Your hammer spring is what provides the power for the hammer to fall and strike the primer. You are overcoming this spring weight when pulling DA.

The trigger return spring is the spring that "springs" the trigger back to its original position after you fire and release the trigger. You are also overcoming this weight when pulling at a certain point.

I think alot of single action work is done with polishing components more than spring weights really. Spring weight may play a small part in it of course, but mainly its polishing sear/hammer surfaces. I'm no expert by any means here, but I've changed out springs on a tuarus and a smith and wesson and all I noticed really was a change in DA pull.

You might want to check to see if wolf has a spring pack for reducing trigger pull. Usually you get three hammer springs and two or three trigger return springs. Then you can mix and match and see what gives you the best results with maintaining reliability.

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Old September 6th, 2006, 07:40 PM   #3
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I have a GP100 and have never fired it double action; I cant really see why a person would want to .
I'm not trying to be a smarta##; this attitude probably comes from firing single action revolvers where cocking the hammer is a natural part of holster presentation...

I am however interested in any modifications to the revolver you will be making. Keep us informed!

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Old September 9th, 2006, 07:01 AM   #4
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Your Ruger revolver uses a coil mainspring, or hammer spring. The trigger return spring will affect trigger pull by a much smaller margin. The hammer spring is the main spring of the "action", all the internal mechanics that rotate the cylinder and fire the weapon. The trigger return spring is a very small spring that does what its name implies. It returns the trigger to the home position after the action cycles and the weapon fires, and you release the trigger. The tendency of a coil spring is to increase its' power the more that it is compressed. You can feel this effect in the trigger, it is called "stacking." A lighter Wolff spring will provide some relief, but cannot overcome the laws of physics as they apply to coil springs. The problem is that when you lighten a trigger pull this way, you cannot go very far before you will begin to have ignition problems with certain ammo because of light primer strikes. The type of ammo that will most likely not function 100% will be something like GoldDots, or any product that uses CCI primers, which are the hardest primers. If you load your own, use Federal primers, as these are the softest. These are used almost exclusively by folks who compete. I have found Wolff springs to be excellent in my autos, but in my double action revolvers their use is always accompanied by unintended results, primarily light primer strikes, and I have had timing issues accentuated by the lighter action. This is all bad news if you intend to carry this weapon for personal defense as I do. If you think you are going to shoot single action in a self-defense situation, then there is a name for you: VICTIM. A self-defense revolver must be used in double action. Yes, I know what a Colt Army is, but this is not 1890 any more, either. In all practicality, you and I are not fast enough to produce a weapon from concealment and fire it single action multiple times quickly, to stop the threat in a life or death situation. What you want is a light, even, consistent double action trigger pull. The best potential for a good double action trigger pull is found in the design of the Smith & Wesson action, K, L, N, or X frame size. (J frames use a coil spring) These actions use a flat spring, which has a consistent weight throughout the pull, it does not stack. I have an N frame which is being completed right now, that has been converted to double action only that will have less than a 2 pound trigger, and will ignite CCI primers with 100% reliability. You simply cannot get there with any other design. Colt also makes fine double action revolvers, but the majority of people who shoot double action feel that the S&W action is better. I am not bashing any manufacturer, I own many different brands of firearms. Shooting a double action revolver in single action is fine for hunting, but not the ideal situation for self defense. I have coil spring revolvers that I hunt with, no worries, but for double action shooting they can never be as good as a Smith, by design. If you are interested, PM me for contact informatation. I use a gunsmith that builds S&W revolvers for competition and self defense, that knows a lot more about this subject than I. Oh, and practice. A lot. Get some snap caps and practice your draw and double action dry firing as often as you can. Speed and accuracy in shooting a double action revolver is all about trigger control.
If you do decide to change your springs, make sure you know how to properly disassemble a revolver. Removing the side plate DOES NOT involve any prying.

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Old April 27th, 2017, 06:38 AM   #5
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I got a Wolff Spring Kit for me .357 Ruger/WClapp 3" barrel. Love it and can stay in the black very well 25 ft. Wondering if anybody else has this wheel gun, got a red. spring kit and what you found as best hammer and trigger weightsyou went and stick with. Looks like you need 3-4 hands to install them so looking maybe to change them once (?). Reviews on these spring replacement kits vary... 12 hammer/8 trigger, 12/10, 12/9, but many of them are from guys who reload where I don't using Magtech 158 gr. FMJ range practice and 125 JHP Corbon's carry. Thanks.

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Old April 27th, 2017, 07:08 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akfanatic View Post
I have a GP100 and have never fired it double action; I cant really see why a person would want to .
I'm not trying to be a smarta##; this attitude probably comes from firing single action revolvers where cocking the hammer is a natural part of holster presentation...

I am however interested in any modifications to the revolver you will be making. Keep us informed!
If I was carrying one for self-defense( I have carried revolvers in the past) I would never ever get in the habit of firing single action.

Most of my revolvers have a few thousand rounds thru them fired DA only and the actions pretty much smoothed themselves out.

Of course they are all Pre-lock model S&Ws.

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Old April 27th, 2017, 09:05 AM   #7
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A couple of years ago I happened on an excellent deal on a new GP100 From Davidsons.
.357 3" barrel adjustable sights. Most 3" are not adjustable sights. Love the gun hated the DA pull. Bought a Wilson Combat #246 spring kit for GP100 and now have a wonderful reliable defensive handgun. With the kit you get 3 different hammer springs and 2 trigger return springs. 9,10,&12# hammer and 8&10# trigger return. With the kit you get a chance to find out what works best for YOU without a long time waiting to get the different springs shipped etc. if you have to order.

From experience I installed the 10# hammer and return springs. The DA pull is now much easier to deal with. Actually a joy. I use CCI primers almost 100% of the time and have not had a failure to fire yet. after at least 700 rounds. I have also done this on my 2 Ruger Security Sixes with no ill effects. One of them has had at least 10,000 rounds through it with only one failure ( due to a broken factory spring at about 2,000).

While the mainspring give you the most reduction the trigger spring also contributes to the amount of backward pressure you have to exert to operate the mechanism. Some expert DA shooters like to leave the trigger return spring factory or even stronger to get a quicker reset. Personally I can not tell the difference.

Spring replacement in the Ruger line is very easy and there are several YouTube videos that describe the job. I hope this helps

Thanks from mic52
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Old April 27th, 2017, 09:12 AM   #8
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Just noticed this thread is from 2006. Why are we dragging it up again now?

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Old April 28th, 2017, 08:03 AM   #9
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Just noticed this thread is from 2006. Why are we dragging it up again now?
I'm "dragging it up" because good info and questions NEVER outdate. This is why it archives. My question stands. Thanks for you guys who responded.

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Old April 28th, 2017, 12:31 PM   #10
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I had a Smith do an action job on my Colt Peacekeeper years ago and I was expecting a good polishing of contact points which I got . It had a great double action trigger pull nice and smooth it worked well until I had a nice buck in my sights I pulled the trigger and nothing but the click of the hammer. I was pissed! What I found later was he clipped the hammer spring so I got a light strike on the primer if the factory loads I used. Light primer strikes suck!

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Old April 28th, 2017, 10:34 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Sniper_M-14 View Post
I had a Smith do an action job on my Colt Peacekeeper years ago and I was expecting a good polishing of contact points which I got . It had a great double action trigger pull nice and smooth it worked well until I had a nice buck in my sights I pulled the trigger and nothing but the click of the hammer. I was pissed! What I found later was he clipped the hammer spring so I got a light strike on the primer if the factory loads I used. Light primer strikes suck!
Cutting springs is quick. Deburring and polishing parts is time-consuming.

IMHO, merely installing lighter weight springs without deburring and judiciously polishing parts is merely a band-aid. Too many people think that installing a set of reduced power springs constitutes an 'action job,' and it doesn't.

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