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Shimming scope base mount.

This is a discussion on Shimming scope base mount. within the Gunsmithing forums, part of the M14 M1A Forum category; Here is my S&W 1500 with Warne bases. Your Vanguard might should look like this. No mounting problem here. btw, the rings are Burris Signature ...


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Old February 8th, 2017, 08:42 AM   #31
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Here is my S&W 1500 with Warne bases. Your Vanguard might should look like this. No mounting problem here. btw, the rings are Burris Signature rings with spherical inserts.
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File Type: jpg S&W 1500-Warne bases.JPG (1.38 MB, 4 views)

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Old February 8th, 2017, 11:50 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Earthquake View Post
I would take the scope of and lay a straight edge on top of the bases and see where you are at, if the front base is higher then the rear there is your problem. You can buy shim kits from Brownell's...
http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...-prod6883.aspx
Do you have bases numbers 902 and 876? these are what listed in the Warne catolog.

Casey
I have the Warne Maxima Series for Weatherby non-magnum action #'s M888-875M. I just looked this up on the Warne web site, sure enuf, Wrong bases. These are for the MK v. Thanks Earthquake. Looks like the guy at Midsouth Shooters sold me the wrong bases. While this is a PITA, at least we found some thing concrete to point the finger at. I'll box these back up tomorrow and get things going in the right direction.
Thanks folks

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Old February 8th, 2017, 11:53 AM   #33
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I new something wasn't right from the start of this. I'm glad you found the culprit.

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Old February 8th, 2017, 07:52 PM   #34
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I new something wasn't right from the start of this. I'm glad you found the culprit.
Very deceiving since they fit perfectly. I'm sure the only difference will be thickness designed to bring the scope on plane with the bore.
Thanks to Earthquake for taking the time to go to the Warne web site and look this up. Simple thing that I never thought to do, mostly because I was told by the salesman that these were the bases I needed.

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Old February 9th, 2017, 02:08 AM   #35
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Here's a little trick to getting your scope zeroed...

Press a small mirror up against the objective lens of the scope. Look through scope (while holding the mirror in place). If you only see one crosshair, your scope is zeroed. If you see two sets of crosshairs, your scope is not at mechanical zero. Adjust your turrets until both crosshairs are laid over each other an you only see one set of crosshairs.

This is called reflection alignment.



Tony.


Last edited by tonyben; February 9th, 2017 at 02:22 AM.
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Old February 9th, 2017, 06:11 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by tonyben View Post
Here's a little trick to getting your scope zeroed...

Press a small mirror up against the objective lens of the scope. Look through scope (while holding the mirror in place). If you only see one crosshair, your scope is zeroed. If you see two sets of crosshairs, your scope is not at mechanical zero. Adjust your turrets until both crosshairs are laid over each other an you only see one set of crosshairs.

This is called reflection alignment.



Tony.
Amazing! I just did this and it worked exactly as described. Thanks Tony! As posted above, I counted clicks to get my elevation back to zero and this proved I was very close. I was only about 8 clicks off. I haven't bothered with the windage till now and it needed about 10 clicks to line it up. Still no word back from Burris on how to return my scope back to mechanical zero......

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Old February 9th, 2017, 06:13 AM   #37
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We calibrate autocolimators using precision mirrors and optical wedges. It's cool to see this process transferring into my favorite hobby!

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyben View Post
Here's a little trick to getting your scope zeroed...

Press a small mirror up against the objective lens of the scope. Look through scope (while holding the mirror in place). If you only see one crosshair, your scope is zeroed. If you see two sets of crosshairs, your scope is not at mechanical zero. Adjust your turrets until both crosshairs are laid over each other an you only see one set of crosshairs.

This is called reflection alignment.



Tony.

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Old February 9th, 2017, 06:32 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by russmerle View Post
We calibrate autocolimators using precision mirrors and optical wedges. It's cool to see this process transferring into my favorite hobby!
Cool! I work with lasers and optics every day and we probably use many of the same kinds of tooling as you do. I'm not solely dedicated to the laser and optics portion though. I build custom laser drilling/machining systems from bare frame and pile-o-parts to actual systems that are shipped and sold to customers.

Sometimes I'm simply given a CAD shot of optical components and distances between optics. Then I have to lay everything out on an optics table or wall and align/collimate according to the specs that the engineers determine.

We use lasers ranging anywhere in power from 0.5W to 400W and wavelengths from 343nm to 10.8Ám.

In fact, some of the optics engineers we have, have gone to work for Leupold, which is a mile away from our factory. Some have returned and realized it wasn't their thing. Others still work there.

Tony.

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Old February 9th, 2017, 06:37 AM   #39
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Yeh, I really wanted to ask how this works, but I'm sure the answer is over my pay grade....

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Old February 9th, 2017, 07:00 AM   #40
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Yeh, I really wanted to ask how this works, but I'm sure the answer is over my pay grade....
It's actually pretty simple. Think of it this way, if you stand in squarely in front of a piece of flat metal and you shoot a BB-gun squarely at it, what happens? The BB comes right back and hits you. In a perfect world and in a perfect situation, in a vacuum with no gravity, in theory, the BB would bounce straight back and go back into the barrel.

If the trajectory of the BB is slightly not perpendicular, to the sheet of metal, then it will not bounce back exactly from where it started, it may be close, but it would not be at the exact spot.

Well since we're dealing with optics, the crosshair is actually mounted inside a tube within the scope housing (what would be the barrel of the BB gun). The knobs adjust the angle of the tube.



By adjusting the tube you adjust the displacement of the image as it travels through other lenses. By placing a mirror on the end of the scope, the image is projected back through the optics showing the user the image shift and misalignment.

The crosshair is the BB and the secondary crosshair is where the BB would hit after it bounces back.

Tony.

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Old February 9th, 2017, 08:27 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyben View Post
It's actually pretty simple. Think of it this way, if you stand in squarely in front of a piece of flat metal and you shoot a BB-gun squarely at it, what happens? The BB comes right back and hits you. In a perfect world and in a perfect situation, in a vacuum with no gravity, in theory, the BB would bounce straight back and go back into the barrel.

If the trajectory of the BB is slightly not perpendicular, to the sheet of metal, then it will not bounce back exactly from where it started, it may be close, but it would not be at the exact spot.

Well since we're dealing with optics, the crosshair is actually mounted inside a tube within the scope housing (what would be the barrel of the BB gun). The knobs adjust the angle of the tube.



By adjusting the tube you adjust the displacement of the image as it travels through other lenses. By placing a mirror on the end of the scope, the image is projected back through the optics showing the user the image shift and misalignment.

The crosshair is the BB and the secondary crosshair is where the BB would hit after it bounces back.

Tony.
OK, I understand that. I'm going to cross this post over to another forum I lurk on. IMHO it really is a valuable piece of information. Again, thanks for sharing. I just got off the phone with Midsouth Shooters. Bases are being returned no problem. Correct Part#'s are ordered. I'll have this thing back together and out to the range next week end.

Thanks from tonyben
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Old February 9th, 2017, 05:04 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyben View Post
Here's a little trick to getting your scope zeroed...

Tony.
Sure wish I had known that a bunch of years ago - thanks.

Warning: Thread hijack in progress...

Is that an air rifle with big focus wheel? You shoot HFT by chance?

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Old February 9th, 2017, 05:30 PM   #43
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Sure wish I had known that a bunch of years ago - thanks.

Warning: Thread hijack in progress...

Is that an air rifle with big focus wheel? You shoot HFT by chance?
I just searched the internet until I found a picture of what I was describing. It sure looks like an air rifle scope.

Tony.

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Old February 11th, 2017, 04:05 PM   #44
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Everyone save themselves a lot of time and just PM Tony for help! Thanks Tony!

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Old February 11th, 2017, 04:36 PM   #45
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You should be able to get on paper without a laser bore sighter on a bolt action rifle.

Remove the bolt from the rifle.
Support the rifle with either a front rest or bipod and rear bag, or a pair of bags and aim the rifle at a target.
Look through the barrel and see if you see the target through the bore.
If you do you should hit the paper.

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