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Saurkraut

This is a discussion on Saurkraut within the Broken Arrow forums, part of the Gun Forum category; Fortunately, my local German grocery store recently reopened after a fire. I plan to be swimming in Saurkraut and Leiberkaise soon. It's been a long ...


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Old August 14th, 2012, 01:22 PM   #16
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Fortunately, my local German grocery store recently reopened after a fire.

I plan to be swimming in Saurkraut and Leiberkaise soon.

It's been a long year waiting for them to re-open.

Thanks from bigbang
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Old August 14th, 2012, 01:52 PM   #17
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I never thought of that!

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Originally Posted by FNG7720 View Post
I make a mean kapusta almost every New Year's Day. It's the ultimate hangover food. For the kraut part, you'll get a better result with the fermentation process if you use a natural crock instead of glass.
The salt and acetic acid (vinegar) should be an excellent hangover recovery food!

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Old August 14th, 2012, 02:33 PM   #18
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+ 1 for sauerkraut with pork roast and applesauce!

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Old August 14th, 2012, 05:00 PM   #19
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One big spoon full of fried kraut, . . . one big spoon full of cooked corn, . . . one big spoon full of mashed potatoes, . . . 3 or 4 tablespoons of butter. Mix well, . . . eat, . . . enjoy, . . .

If you got a couple of fried pork chops to munch on with them, . . . and a piece of yellow corn bread, . . . well don't look now, . . . might be an angel flyin' by, . . . you're darn near to heaven's country with that.

Finish up with some fried apples (in cinnamon and brown sugar of course),.........

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Old August 14th, 2012, 07:37 PM   #20
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Well I ordered the crock last night.
That's a real investment and hopefully something you will be able to someday pass down to a younger generation.
I still can't keep the deer away from our cabbage. It's like candy to them I guess. Time for a fence. Selective harvest isn't enough.

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Old August 14th, 2012, 07:39 PM   #21
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My wife and I make a five gallon crock of kraut every fall and then can it. My mom and grandmother did the same. It usually lasts the entire year and we eat it once a week. In fact we're having it for dinner this evening, cooked with pork chops. Real kraut doesn't contain vinegar. Most of the stuff you buy in the grocery store is made with vinegar. The fermentation process gives it the tang but doesn't make it a sour as vinegar. We use kraut cabbage which normally weighs around 15 to 20 pounds per head. If you plan to make a large batch, a kraut cutter will save you a lot of work.

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Old August 14th, 2012, 07:45 PM   #22
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We use kraut cabbage which normally weighs around 15 to 20 pounds per head.
He's not exaggerating. I took a picture of a head near Palmer that easily weighed 25 lbs.
I also agree with the anti-vinegar comments. The flavors of a good batch of kraut are like a good homebrew. Good things come to those that wait.

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Old August 14th, 2012, 09:51 PM   #23
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Can,t believe I wrote a reciepe for Kapusta soup and My computer disconnected ,,,I.ll try later

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Old August 15th, 2012, 01:39 PM   #24
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Quote: If you plan to make a large batch, a kraut cutter will save you a lot of work.


Well we don't plan to make but one batch for this year but I have been wondering about cutting the cabbage up.

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Old August 20th, 2012, 07:54 AM   #25
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Well we packed about 7 pounds of cabbage into the crock yesterday. We salted it as the recipes said to do and then covered it with water since we did not have any cabbage juice.
I really hope this works and the it doesn't go bad. I guess I'll know in a few weeks.

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Old August 20th, 2012, 04:44 PM   #26
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We eat sour kraut a lot but I have to say a friend that spent a year on the Korean DMZ in the late 70's told me I should try Kimchi,he had a friend send him a few jars( care package ) every year.It was strong..good..but strong.I think it was buried in the ground for a time. Good stuff.

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Old August 21st, 2012, 08:58 AM   #27
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I wuz hoping a good home recipe for kimchi would come out of this but if that doesn't happen there's always the internet, once I have enough time and cabbage....

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Old August 21st, 2012, 07:36 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by Hole_Puncher View Post
Well we packed about 7 pounds of cabbage into the crock yesterday. We salted it as the recipes said to do and then covered it with water since we did not have any cabbage juice.
I really hope this works and the it doesn't go bad. I guess I'll know in a few weeks.
I remember my Dad talking about making kraut in a crock on the family farm up in West Virginia. They didn't add any water, just alternating layers of shredded cabbage and pickling salt, weighted down with a stoneware plate with heavy (clean) rock on top. They did it late in the year, and kept it in a cool basement. The salt draws the juices out of the cabbage, and it ferments naturally, producing a brine with acetic acid that preserves the kraut after a few weeks. When the fermentation stops, it's ready to eat or can in glass jars. I can't help thinking that adding water would dilute the brine, and prevent the fermentation from working correctly, maybe leaving you with just a crock of rotten cabbage, but you can wait and see what happens.

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Old August 21st, 2012, 07:56 PM   #29
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I wuz hoping a good home recipe for kimchi would come out of this but if that doesn't happen there's always the internet, once I have enough time and cabbage....
KImchi recipes abound on the internet....the video link has over a million hits and it is where I started. I do not make mine exactly as she does though but her technique in how she preps her cabbage is how it is done. Some ingredients you will need while others are preference based. Luckily, there is an actual korean grocery 15 minutes away so I can get my korean red pepper flakes and salted tiny shrimps without getting hosed on price. I make mine in quart size mason jars. KImchi is like grandmas chicken soup...everyone has their own recipe. It is also made out of many things beside cabbage...a really good version is made from korean radish (moo). Easily found in a korean market. This video is worth watching for the ten minutes.


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Old August 22nd, 2012, 02:37 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by GCBurner View Post
I remember my Dad talking about making kraut in a crock on the family farm up in West Virginia. They didn't add any water, just alternating layers of shredded cabbage and pickling salt, weighted down with a stoneware plate with heavy (clean) rock on top. They did it late in the year, and kept it in a cool basement. The salt draws the juices out of the cabbage, and it ferments naturally, producing a brine with acetic acid that preserves the kraut after a few weeks. When the fermentation stops, it's ready to eat or can in glass jars. I can't help thinking that adding water would dilute the brine, and prevent the fermentation from working correctly, maybe leaving you with just a crock of rotten cabbage, but you can wait and see what happens.
Actually according to my book the acid is lactic acid not acetic acid. And the salt prevents the spoliage of the cabbage over the first 4-5 days until the lactic forms in a high enough concentration that it preserves the cabbage turning it into saurkraut. The water that is added is salted water so nothing is diluted and the recipe said to make sure the cabbage is covered above the stones.

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